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We Deliver... Socially

03-November-2016
03-November-2016 7:51
in General
by Admin

Employment is the gold standard by which we judge social outcomes here at The Severn Project. Our policy is to employ people with significant barriers to the workplace. As a small scale business, each employee, regardless of their background, plays a significant role in the daily running of the farm. At the Severn Project we do not categorise individuals by ‘ability’ or background, but work together as a team, enabling people to reach their full potential. We have seen that meaningful and fulfilling employment empowers individuals. Currently eight of our 11 employees come from backgrounds that could constrain access to mainstream employment.

 

    

 

Across the UK, the density of people employed in the agricultural sector has fallen by 50% since 1980, with a current national average of just 0.01 persons per acre. At The Severn Project, growing our salad and herbs requires 2.4 persons per acre, including ancillary workers (admin, packing and delivery) the density of workers required is 4.4 persons per acre. We have demonstrated the success of local small-scale food production in generating employment and volunteering opportunities in urban areas, and now we are about to replicate these social outcome in a rural setting.

 

 

Quotes:

As well as being a business, I have personal experience of how The Severn Project works within the community. I am a Work Placement Officer for City of Bristol College, working with students who have additional needs. In the past year Steve has taken three of our students on work placements, each with their own challenges. There is an attitude of everyone deserves a chance within the organisation and this benefits those with the least opportunities in society. All three students have been offered paid work at the end of their placement.

One of those students is still there on the payroll and the team have worked hard to make him part of the team and concentrate on his strengths rather than his learning difficulty. This has made a huge difference to this young person’s life, boosting his self-esteem simply by being able to earn his own wages.

There is an ethos of giving back within the company and it deserves lots of support in this endeavour. In the long run, it will benefit the surrounding community.

Sue King City of Bristol College

 

 

If it wasn’t for The Severn Project, I don’t know what I would have done upon my release from prison. Now I’m employed and feel like part of the community.

Dave